Positions

2014 - Now. Scientist Cancer Research UK, Cambridge Institute, UK

Verification of biomarkers for breast cancer by selected reaction monitoring.

2013 - Now. Scientist Targeted Proteomics, Cambridge Centre for Proteomics and Addenbrooke's Hospital, University of Cambridge, UK

The application of targeted proteomics to clinical questions is the aim of this study. Techniques involve SRM (Selected Reaction Monitoring) and SWATH to discover biomarkers but especially to verify them.

2012 - Now. Founder, Targeted Proteomics Forum, Cambridge, UK

Targeted proteomics involves the repetitive identification and quantitation of proteins of interest. This is different form the classic discovery based proteomics where the aim is to measure as many proteins as possible. The big opportunity of Targeted Proteomics is that it can verify and validate the role of proteins in e.g. disease, their role in signalling or their involvement in drug response. This forum was set up in 2012 to 1) form an interactive community about targeted proteomics to discuss its progress, technical issues and opportunities and 2) to be able to perform state of the art Targeted Proteomics experiments. This forum is focussed of Cambridge now but has no geographical limitations.

2010 - 2013 Research Associate, Cambridge Centre for Proteomics, University of Cambridge, UK and KAUST, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia

Phosphorylation is an important way of communication in cells and in this project we aimed to map the changes of phosphorylation upon cGMP signalling in the plant Arabidopsis thaliana. cGMP is an important second messenger for stimuli like abscisic acid. The Cambridge Centre for Proteomics is headed by Prof. Kathryn Lilley and was set-up in 2000 and operates three parallel strands; core proteomic facility, large scale collaborative project and development of proteomics technologies.

2012 - 2013 Treasurer CUSPE (Cambridge University Science and Policy Exchange), UK

The Cambridge University Science and Policy Exchange (CUSPE) aims to bridge the gap between Science and Policy which is beneficial for both sites. CUSPE aims to do so by building strong links between early career researchers at Cambridge and government policy officials, both within the UK and the European Union.

2009 - 2010 Vice-President CUTEC (Cambridge University Technology and Enterprise Club, Content Team), UK

The Cambridge University Technology and Enterprise Club (CUTEC) aims to enhance the entrepreneurial spirit amongst students and brings together students, PhD-students, scientists, investors, entrepreneurs and other professionals. As Vice-President I was leading a team of 15 people.

2007 - 2010 Research Associate, Cambridge Centre for Proteomics, University of Cambridge, UK

Quantitative organelle proteomics is used to assign proteins to subcellular compartments (organelles) by looking at their steady state position. The central technology is called LOPIT (Localisation of Organelle Proteins by Isotope Tagging). The strength of this approach is the probabilistic nature by which a protein is assigned to (an) organelle(s) instead of a black and white verdict. This opens up the opportunities to trace dynamics of protein trafficking upon perturbations like hormones, drugs and/or during different developmental stages. The Cambridge Centre for Proteomics is headed by Prof. Kathryn Lilley and was set-up in 2000 and operates three parallel strands; core proteomic facility, large scale collaborative project and development of proteomics technologies.

2006 - 2007 President, ELSYS (European Life Sciences for Young Scientists Conference), The Netherlands

ELSYS unites three different aspects of Life Sciences that are important for young scientists 1) presentation of results, 2) interactive session about the newest innovations and 3) career development workshops. The conference resulted in a 2 day event in February 2007 attracting about hundred students, entrepreneurs, academics and representatives from industry. ELSYS was part of the Genomics Network for Young Scientists (GeNeYouS)

2002 - 2006 PhD Student, Hubrecht Institute for Developmental Biology, Utrecht, The Netherlands

Research at the Hubrecht Insitute focuses on developmental biology and stem cells at the organismal, cellular, genetic , genomic and proteomic level. My focus was on phosphorylation of proteins which is of major importance in cell signalling processes like cell migration, cell proliferation and cell differentiation, The research in the laboratory of Prof. Jeroen den Hertog focussed on the regulation of membrane phosphatases.

2000 - 2001 Master Student, EMBL (European Molecular Biology Laboratory), Grenoble, France

The EMBL is a non-profit organisation and a basic research institute funded by public research monies form 20 member states and one associate member and is one of the world's leading research institutions, and Europe's flagship laboratory for the life Sciences. My work was performed at the EMBL Grenoble site and was focussed on the Influenza virus.

1995 - 2000 Master of Science, Biomedical Sciences, University of Utrecht, The Netherlands


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